Look England seek to surpass India without Stokes at Lord’s

Root hugs Rashid after the spinner whose selection split opinion dismissed Sharma

Neither side made 300 in the match, England posting 287 before India replied with 274 in the first innings.

Hours before the scheduled start of play the playing XI for both teams was revealed after a Twitter user named "Bumrah" took to the social platform and posted the squads for both the teams.

Hosts England lead the five-match series after their 31-run victory in the gripping first Test at Birmingham. The left-hander managed a total of 39 runs in Edgbaston and got out in a similar fashion in both the innings.

We feel Shikhar Dhawan too could make way for C Pujara, who was surprisingly left out in the first Test.

After scoring his maiden ton on the English soil, Kohli returned in the second innings and played a 51-run knock to steer India closer to the 194 runs target set by England. London had experienced heat waves and thus dry wickets were expected at Lord's. We will have to wait for it to stop raining to discover whether they have bolstered the batting or moved Rahul up to open and picked two spinners.

Despite that the team management could make a few changes, bringing in a second spinner to add more firepower, depending on the nature of the wicket at Lord's.

Joe Root's men have yet to decide how they will replace key all-rounder Ben Stokes, who will miss the match in the capital while he attends his affray trial at Bristol Crown Court. In that scenario, Umesh Yadav can be left out with Ishant Sharma, Mohammed Shami and Hardik Pandya handling the pace duties.

Also, they have dropped Dawid Malan and Ollie Pope could find a place in the 11. That said, given the nature of the pitch at Lord's and England spin troubles, the visitors might play Kuldeep Yadav alongside Ashwin. We know that Fifties throwback Ollie Pope will make his debut today but have yet to be informed whether Moeen Ali is back in the side after four Tests out or Chris Woakes returns after missing Edgbaston.

The ringing of the five-minute bell at a Lord's Test by an worldwide cricketer, administrator or well-known enthusiast of the sport is a recent tradition introduced in 2007.

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