Trump administration moves ahead with new round of tariffs on Chinese imports

Beijing has called on U.S. officials to be "cool headed", but fired back warning it would impose duties on an additional $60 billion in United States goods, a threat the White House dismissed as "weak".

Talks between the two countries on the issues have failed to produce an agreement, prompting China to retaliate with tariffs of its own and US President Donald Trump to escalate his threats.

Sales to the U.S. rose by 13.3%, while China's surplus with the States shrank marginally to $28.1bn (£21.7bn) last month from a record $29bn (£22.4bn) in June.

Beijing has already threatened to retaliate against United States products in kind, warning Washington against "blackmailing and pressuring".

Over the weekend, Trump said he had the upper hand in the trade war, while Beijing responded through state media by saying it was ready to endure the economic fallout.

The two sides have shown no signs of letting up, with the USA earlier Wednesday saying it will begin collecting 25 percent tariffs on another $16 billion in Chinese goods on August 23, and Chinese media resorting to personal attacks against Trump earlier in the week. However, analysts still expect a less favourable trade balance for China in coming months given it's early days in the tariff brawl.

Although the move was expected, it cements the view that there appears to be no effort underway to defuse the dispute between the world's two largest economies.

Trump has also threatened 25 percent tariffs on another $200 billion worth of Chinese goods, and possibly another $300 billion worth, in his administration's quest for changes to China's intellectual property, market access and industrial subsidy policies.

"We expect export growth to cool in the coming months, though this will primarily reflect softer global growth rather than United States tariffs, the direct impact of which will continue to be mostly offset by the renminbi's (yuan's) recent depreciation".

All China's main state newspapers published a lengthy commentary by the official Xinhua news agency, entitled "declaration", on their front pages.

John Neuffer, president and CEO of the Semiconductor Industry Association, said in a statement they were disappointed and puzzled why semiconductors remain on the final tariff list.

China has now either imposed or proposed tariffs on $110 billion of US goods, representing the vast majority of China's annual imports of American products.

The office said the move is part of the USA response to China's unfair trade practices related to the forced transfer of American technology and intellectual property.

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