Serena Williams reaches Wimbledon final months after returning from maternity leave

Görges suffered five consecutive first-round defeats at Wimbledon before this year

When the seeds kept tumbling at Wimbledon last week the growing feeling was that the trophy was bound to end up in Serena Williams' arms again for an eighth time at the All England Club.

She said: "I don't know".

Williams' movement is far from the best on tour but her game is so well oiled that it does not matter, her ability to control proceedings ensuring she was always perfectly placed to unleash another groundstroke. I had multiple surgeries and almost didn't make it when I gave birth.

The 23-time major victor can match the Australian legend's total of Slam titles on Saturday, though Williams already holds the record for most Open Era crowns won. "For me it's such a pleasure and a joy because, you know, less than a year ago, I was going through so much stuff". Against the No.25 seed, Goerges would need to raise the tempo, to move her opponent outside her comfort zone but the 23 time Slam champion confirmed to be the most complete player ever.

But Williams, who looked disappointed but still unruffled as he has been right through the tournament - so serene that a journalist couldn't resist asking whether this had something to do with motherhood - reeled off the next four points to break right back and win the match.

I couldn't even walk to my mailbox, so it's definitely not normal for me to be in a Wimbledon final.

Kerber upset Williams in the 2016 Australian Open final, one of two Williams losses in her 12 Grand Slam finals since the start of 2012. At 36 years and 291 days, the sixth-oldest Grand Slam semifinalist in the Open Era dominated 62 64 Julia Goerges and became the third oldest major finalist.

'But as I said in the past couple years, I don't want to limit myself.

But she couldn't keep up with Williams, who grabbed 18 of 22 points and five consecutive games to close the first set and begin the next.

The first of the two matches on Centre Court seemed to hold more promise given the contrasting styles of the two players.

'She's trying to, yeah, playing like she played the years before where she won the big matches. But unlike in the quarterfinals, when she needed seven match points to win, this time it required only two, with the match ending - fittingly enough - on a forehand by Ostapenko that sailed wide. "We saw that she improved every single match she's playing here".

"I don't know if it's been the toughest, because I have Olympia".

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