US adds a solid 213,000 jobs; unemployment up to 4 pct

US adds a solid 213,000 jobs; unemployment up to 4 pct

Data for April and May was revised to show 37,000 more jobs created than previously reported.

The U-6 or underemployment rate rose to 7.8 percent from 7.6 percent; the gauge includes part-time workers who'd prefer a full-time position and people who want a job but aren't actively looking.

The United States has increased jobs monthly for more than seven years, but some analysts suggest that the escalating trade disputes between the U.S. and its allies could threaten growth.

It's the longest streak on record. Nonetheless, at 6.6 million, the number of unemployed Americans could again be smaller than current job openings. Construction payrolls increased by 13,000 after rising by 29,000 jobs in May. But the average was skewed downward in June because the job seekers were mainly those with only a high school education or less, who are generally paid lower wages, Barrera noted. Over the past three months, the economy has produced a robust average monthly job gain of 211,000. It's too soon to tell what impact they'll have - hiring in manufacturing continues to be strong, with 36,000 jobs added in June - but what we do know is that they are creating uncertainty, Hamrick said. "Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 72 cents, or 2.7 percent", BLS said on Friday.

For employers, however, a hot job market is costly.

"I'm really excited to see that the labor force is growing", said Catherine Barrera, chief economist of the online job site ZipRecruiter.

But there is a matter about which the Chairman of the Fed, Jerome Powell, is beginning to express concern, the threat from an escalating tariff "war".

Following the report, US stock turned positive after having been in red figures ahead of the report.

But the Trump administration's "America First" trade policy, which has tipped the United States into a trade war with China poses a risk to the labor market and economy.

"Three of the five states that ranked the worst in this study (Missouri, Alaska, and Kansas) have all experienced a decrease in employment growth over the past year", a GOBankingRates.com representative told Moneyish.

The EPOP for Hispanics rose 0.4 percentage points to 63.4 percent, a new high for the recovery, while their unemployment rate fell to 4.6 percent, the lowest on record.

Although wages grew 2.7% in June from a year ago, they didn't change much from May and came in below economists' expectations.

"He pointed to minutes from the June Federal Open Market Committee, which indicate that some business leaders' "'plans for capital spending had been scaled back or postponed, '" which will likely also affect hiring.

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