Air pollution, smog may permanently damage children's brain, warns UNICEF report

Air Pollution May Permanently Damage Your Child's Brain says UNICEF

Nearly 17 million babies across the world are breathing toxic air, which could be damaging the development of their brains, a report released by UNICEF on Wednesday claims.

The UNICEF report also states that South Asia has the largest proportion of babies living in areas where air pollution is at least six times higher than worldwide limits (10 micrograms per cubic metre).

NEW DELHI | The united Nations has drawn Wednesday to sound the alarm about the dangers posed by air pollution to the developing brains of babies, a scourge that particularly affects the Asian.

The link between air pollution and respiratory diseases is well-established, but the United Nations Children's Fund, in a report on Tuesday, said there is a growing body of scientific research which shows that air pollution can permanently damage a child's brain.

According to the American Lung Association's "State of the Air" report for 2017, almost 40 percent of the United States' population still lives in counties that have unhealthful levels of air pollution. The variety of types of pollutants that are in the air across different environments make it hard to determine the full impact of air pollution.

The report urges parents to reduce children's exposure to harmful chemicals, including from tobacco products and cooking stoves.

Create smart urban planning so that major sources of pollution are not located near schools, clinics or hospitals.

"No child should have to breathe dangerously polluted air", Lake said, "and no society can afford to ignore air pollution".

Unicef says the effects lasted a lifetime.

Brain development in the first 1,000 days of a child's life is critical for their learning, growth and for them "being able to do everything that they want and aspire to in life", he said.

Satellite imagery analyzed by UNICEF indicates that 12.2 million of the children exposed to severe air pollution live in South Asia.

It called for a greater use of masks, air filtration systems and for children to avoid travelling when pollution levels are at their highest.

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