Science shows dogs smarter than cats

Who's Smarter, Dogs or Cats? Science Now Has the Answer

"Garfield" was about an clever talking cat and a stupid dog - but was it wrong?

The study, first of its kind, according to the university, centered around counting the number of cortical neurons in the brains of several carnivores from ferrets and raccoons to cats, dogs, lions and brown bears. We also find that raccoons have dog-like numbers of neurons in their cat-sized brain, which makes them comparable to primates in neuronal density.

She said: "I believe the absolute number of neurons an animal has, especially in the cerebral cortex, determines the richness of their internal mental state and their ability to predict what is about to happen in their environment based on past experience". In nonscientific terms, dogs are smarter than cats.

DOGS really are cleverer than cats and have twice as many intelligence brain cells, according to a new study. Carnivory is one of several factors expected to be cognitively demanding for carnivorans due to a requirement to outsmart larger prey.

That, however, proved to be wrong.

Who's Smarter, Dogs or Cats? Science Now Has the Answer
New Study Suggests Dogs May Be Smarter than Cats

The Vanderbilt findings are included in a paper that examines the number of neurons in a variety of carnivores, USA Today reported.

That means that it may take as much brain power to avoid being caught as it does to do the catching. The research team not only counted the neurons of these animals but their brain size and body-to-brain size ratios. The bear is an extreme example. But a new study may have found a clear victor when it comes to which animal is more intelligent: dogs.

"I would bet money on a large dog over a cat any time", Herculano-Houzel said in a Vanderbilt-produced video. The group was chosen because it has a large range of brain sizes, and includes both domesticated and wild species. But researchers still can't be sure whether dogs are using that capability to its full potential.

"Diversity is enormous", said Houzel. Not every species is made the same way. Yes, there are recognizable patterns, but there are multiple ways that nature has found of putting brains together.

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