Air Canada Jet Nearly Lands On Taxiway At San Francisco International Airport

SFOgraphic

Passengers of an Air Canada flight and four other airplanes waiting to take off had a very close shave when the Air Canada flight nearly landed on the four passenger airplanes waiting to take off on July 7th at the San Francisco International Airport (SFO) in San Francisco, California.

The Air Canada Airbus A320 was cleared to land at a runway at San Francisco global airport on Friday and the pilot began descending toward one of the taxiways, where four aircraft were waiting to take off.

"However, the pilot inadvertently lined up for Taxiway C, which runs parallel to the runway", the statement said. At the same time, four planes loaded with passengers were awaiting confirmation to depart from Air Traffic Control.

Details are emerging about an apparent near-miss at San Francisco International Airport on Friday, in which a flight arriving from Toronto reportedly mistook a taxiway for a runway.

An Air Canada spokesman told Fox News that the flight landed without incident a little later and that the airline is investigating the incident.

The incident occurred at 11:56am on Friday, as the Air Canada jet - an Airbus A320 that can carry as many as 220 people - was coming into land at SFO.

Aviation experts say the incident could've been close to disastrous.

An air traffic controller became aware of the problem and ordered the pilot to pull up and make another approach. He's told there are no other planes on the runway.

Immediately, the controller orders Air Canada flight 759 to go around.

'If it is true, what happened probably came close to the greatest aviation disaster in history, ' retired United Airlines Capt. Ross Aimer, CEO of Aero Consulting Experts told The Mercury News. He said he's been contacted by pilots from across the country about the incident. "We are still investigating the circumstances".

In June, US President Donald Trump announced his ambition to upgrade air traffic control which relies on radar and radio technology.

"If you can imagine an Airbus colliding with four aircraft full of fuel and passengers, you can imagine how this would have been horrifying", he added.

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